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We all know their names, and we all know their compositions, but there are some things about history's greatest composers that most don't of us don't know.

Here is a handful of facts about Beethoven, Bach, Mozart, and others that would make even the most knowledgeable music scholars scratch their heads in disbelief.

Ludwig van Beethoven

It's well known that the legendary German composer Ludwig van Beethoven gradually lost his hearing throughout adulthood, but many don't know the methods and practices Beethoven utilized to continue his career.

One of the ways he overcame his deafness was by biting a metal rod attached to his piano in order to "hear" the vibrations. A collection of hearing aids, including metallic eardrums, allowed Beethoven to continue writing compositions up until his death.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Though Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was a musical prodigy and favorite of aristocratic circles throughout his life, the Austrian composer was buried in a "common grave" shortly after his death at the age of 35.

A common grave is not a communal or a pauper's grave, but relegated for those not a member of the aristocracy, a far removal from the crowds Mozart entertained during his short, yet prolific career.

Johann Sebastian Bach and George Frideric Handel

German Baroque composers Johann Sebastian Bach and George Frideric Handel were both blinded after botched surgeries by the same oculist, John Taylor, in the mid-18th Century. Bach would die from complications after his treatment, though Handel would survive another seven years before he passed away at the age of 74.

Arnold Schoenberg

The Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg was met with great success throughout his musical career throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Schoenberg is primarily remembered for his modernist approach to the German classical styles, but is also known for his severe superstitions.

Schoenberg suffered from severe triskaidekaphobia, the fear of the number 13. There is a great deal of irony here due to the fact that Schoenberg died shortly before midnight on Friday, July 13, 1951.

Anthony Hopkins

Sir Anthony Hopkins is best known for his portrayal of Hannibal Lecter in the Silence Of The Lambs, but in addition to his acting chops, the British actor is also somewhat of an accomplished composer.

In 1964, three years before Hopkins would secure his first acting credit, he composed "And The Waltz Goes On." However, Hopkins would never hear his full composition until it was premiered by Andre Rieu and his orchestra in 2011, nearly 50 years after he first wrote the six-minute long composition.

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