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Saudi Arabia is known for its vast, sandy deserts and one, two, sometimes even three-humped camels, but it turns out the famous desert country isn't so original. According to The Daily Telegraph, Saudi Arabia can only maintain its sandy reputation by enlisting the help of Australia.

Saudi Arabia is going under a new construction boom, which means they need even more raw materials than what their land can produce. Australian companies decided to hop on to the opportunity and export sand from their deserts to growing Middle Eastern cities. Sand is a higher commodity than most people think. After all, it can even be used in everyday items like toothpaste and smartphone screens. Pretty neat that the stuff that gets caught in between your toes can be used to build pyramids and now even your phone.

On top of that, it turns out Saudi Arabia was in desperate need of camels at one point. Camels are used for food and transportation, but their overuse proved to be difficult for Saudi Arabia. It turned out the remaining population lived thousands of miles away in Australia.

Let's hope Saudi Arabia and Australia are a bit more careful with these large creatures for the following decades to come.

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