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If anything, humans are emotional creatures, and sometimes, those emotions can get the best of us.

This is true now more than ever in the aftermath of the death of an Indonesian man who was partially eaten by a crocodile when he ventured a little too close to the breeding grounds of the reptile at a protected crocodile sanctuary. Shortly after the man died, family, friends, and fellow residents from the small village of Jakarta held a funeral that concluded with the senseless capture and murder of nearly 300 crocodiles.

But is this an act of mob justice or is this just another tale in humanity's long history of getting caught up in a mob mentality?

Police in Jarkarta are saying the 48-year-old man, who the mob was avenging, entered the breeding ground on his own volition earlier that day in an attempt to collect grass for his cattle when he was attacked and killed by a crocodile.

The large group of angered villagers left the man's funeral and headed straight for the breeding ground where its members spent the rest of the afternoon hunting and capturing 292 crocodiles before killing them with an arsenal made up of "machetes, hammers, shovels, and other sharp objects," according to the local Natural Resources and Conservation Agency.

The mob proceeded to kill at least two large crocodiles of up to 13 feet and many babies measuring between 20 and 60 inches before the attack was finally concluded.

The small, 40-man police force attempted to break up the mob and stop the attack, but all efforts were fruitless as the group of a few dozen police officers and employees of the sanctuary were no match for the estimated 600 villagers who made up the group.

"We couldn't do anything," said Sorong police chief Dewa Made Sidan Sutrahna. "The situation was so tense."

No arrests were made immediately after the incident, but authorities were conducting interviews with involved parties as part of the investigation.

As police continued with the investigation in the days following the slaughter, they also decided to burn and bury the nearly 300 carcasses that sat in the hot Indonesian sun.

"The dead crocodiles have been burned and buried around the farming area,' said Basar Manullang, a West Papua conservation official."

So, what is your take on this story? Let us know in the comments!

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